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Afe Adogame

Dr. Afe Adogame, Keynote speaker for the 2013 World Mission Institute

2013 World Mission Institute

Each year LSTC hosts the World Mission Institute, which is jointly sponsored with LSTC, Catholic Theological Union and McCormick Theological Seminary for the purpose of focusing on interpreting the worldwide mission of the church. Download 2013 Conference Brochure

“African Immigrant Churches and Mission in North America and Europe” topic for World Mission Institute

Keynote speaker Dr.Afe Adogame, presented two lectures at the 2012 World Mission Institute on April 18-19. On April 18, Dr. Adogame presented “Because He Lives, We Can Face Tomorrow! New African Immigrants and the Changing Face of Christianity in Europe and North America.”

On the morning of April 19 his topic was “Mission to a Prodigal West! African Missionaries Beyond the Rhetoric of Reverse Mission in Europe and USA.”

 

Listen to the keynote lectures from the Institute below.


1) "Because He Lives, We Can Face Tomorrow! New African Immigrants and the Changing Face of Christianity in Europe and North America" by Afe Adogame. [Download and listen to MP3 file] Or press the arrow below to begin streaming audio.

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2) “Mission to a Prodigal West! African Missionaries Beyond the Rhetoric of Reverse Mission in Europe and USA.” by Afe Adogame.
[Download and listen to MP3 file] Or press the arrow below to begin streaming audio.

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Listen to the lecture by clicking on the "play arrow" above.

 

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About the speaker

Dr. Afe Adogame is a Senior Lecturer in World Christianity and Religious Studies at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. He joined the faculty in 2005. He previously taught at Bayreuth University in Germany and Lagos State University in Nigeria. He is the author of The African Christian Diaspora: New Currents and Emerging Trends in World Christianity (Continuum, 2013) and Celestial Church of Christ: The Politics of Cultural Identity in a West African Prophetic-Charismatic Movement (Peter Lang, 1999). He is the co-editor of several academic studies on African immigrant religion as well as African religions, including Whose Afraid of the Holy Ghost?: Pentecostalism and Globalization in Africa and Beyond (AWP, 2011), Christianity in Africa and the African Diaspora, with R. Gerloff and K. Hock (Continuum, 2011), and Religion Crossing Boundaries: Transnational Religious and Social Dynamics in Africa and the New Africa Diaspora, with J. Spickard (Brill, 2010).

About the World Mission Institute Theme for 2013

New African immigrant Christians have ushered in a new historical moment in Europe and North America. They have established more than five thousand Christian congregations in Europe and North America. Some African-led denominations, such as the Redeemed Christian Church of God, with headquarters in Nigeria, have established more than eleven-hundred congregations in the West. The New African immigrants pastor megachurches such as Embassy of God in Kiev, Ukraine, Kingsway Christian Centre in London, and Jesus House in Washington, D.C. These congregations and denominations utilize a host of institutions to fulfill their mission, institutions ranging from religious schools, colleges, bookstores and other media (print, radio, television, and a growing internet presence) along with Christian congregations.

New African immigrant congregations often belong to transnational denominational networks that join congregations in the West to denominations in Africa. Prominent denominations present in Europe and North America include Nigeria’s Redeemed Christian Church of God, and Ghana’s Church of Pentecost. These denominations range from Pentecostal to Presbyterian and Ethiopian Orthodox. Through transnational networks, New African Immigrant congregations exchange pastors, songs, theologies, and mission strategies.

Chicago hosts a cross-section of New African Immigrant congregations. Their congregants hail from Nigeria, Ghana, Ethiopia, Cameroon, Liberia, and other African countries. These congregations reflect different relationships with predominantly white denominations and predominantly African-American denominations.

New African immigrant Christianity in the West is a product of a new moment in World Christianity, produced by the post-1970s exponential growth of African Christianity – a pivotal factor in shifting the center of gravity within World Christianity from the global North to the global South. Within the West, New African immigrant Christians are redefining the contours and contexts of Christianity in Europe and North America.

Page last modified Jul 24, 2014