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Luther's Works

Publications by Luther 1524

Achtliederbuch (First Lutheran Hymnal)

Gruber 136.3

Gruber 136.3.

Gruber 136.2

Gruber 136.2

Gruber 136.1

Gruber 136.1

Gruber 136.4

Gruber 136.4


Title page, hymn by Luther (in two pictures) and one by Speratus

Gruber 67 Etlich Cristlich lider Lobgesang un Psalm dem rainen wort Gottes...zü Wittenberg in übung ist. Wittenberg MDXIIII [sic, = 1524). Achtliederbuch. Begins with signature B. First item: Ein Gesang Doct. Sperati zu bekennen den Glauben.


Gruber 136 Etlich Cristlich lider Lobgesang und Psalm dem rainen wort Gottes...zü Wittenberg in übung ist. Wittenberg MDXIIII. Unbound. (Some Christian Hymns, Canticles, and Psalms made according to the Pure Word of God, from Holy Scrip;ture by several very Learned Men, to Sing in Church as it is in part already Practiced in Wittenberg, 1524) Benzing 3571; WA 35.336-337; Luther's Works 53.315-316 (Preface). Two thirds of Luther's three dozen hymns were written in 1523-1524. In the "Book of Eight Hymns" (Achtliederbuch) the oldest Lutheran hymnal, four of the hymns are by Luther, three by his friend Paul Speratus, and one is anonymous. Luther's hymns were: Dear Christians, Let Us Now Rejoice Luther's Works 35:217-220; Ah God, from Heaven Look Down Luther's Works 53:225-228; Although the Fools Say with Their Mouth Luther's Works 53:229-231; and From Trouble Deep I Cry to Thee Luther's Works 53:221-224.

 

Exhortation for all Cities to Establish Schools

An die Radherrn...

An die Radherrn...

An die Radherrn aller stedte deutsches lands... Wittenberg: Cranach & Döring, 1524. (To the Councilmen of all cities in Germany that they establish schools 1524) Aland 676; Benzing; 1875; WA 15.15ff; Luther's Works 45:341-78. Maywood BR332.E3S (36090). An die Ratherren aller Städte deutschen Landes...dass sie....Schulen aufrichten...sollen. Click to enlarge thumbnail.

Translation also in Lull, Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings, 460-478.

"It was a sad and unexpected consequence of the Reformation attack on monasticism that the immediate effects on education were negative. As persons left religious orders, and as their property was seized by nobles and evident greed, the traditional role that these institutions played in educating the young disappeared....In this treatise Luther urges the councilmen of all German cities to make new provision for public education....The treatise contains a fine defense of non-practical learning and a spirited attack by Luther on German miserliness. He also strongly defends educating both boys and girls, and chides parents for their selfishness in keeping children out of school for the short term gain of what they can earn." Lull, 460.


The Gruber Collection was assembled by L. Franklin Gruber, President of Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary, Maywood, Illinois.

Annotation prepared by Ralph W Klein